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Could listening to the deep sea help save it?

A recent New York Times article about sound in the deep ocean briefly mentions the work by 2串1技巧 Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) acoustic scientist Ying-Tsong 鈥淵T鈥 Lin and his work developing an 鈥渁coustic telescope.鈥

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Uncharted waters

Uncharted Water

Our global ocean will change dramatically over the next few decades. What might it look like, and how will humans adapt?

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The many lifetimes of plastics

plastics by the numbers

Infographics strive to give us a sense of how long plastic goods will last in the environment. But is this information reliable? The findings of a new study from WHOI may surprise you.

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Bottlenose dolphins continue to compensate for humans in spite of pandemic

Though vessel noise may be quieting down on the high seas, one coastal area in Florida is seeing an upswing in boat traffic according to local authorities, putting more pressure on the world鈥檚 longest-studied wild bottlenose dolphin community. A recent WHOI study suggests this is only the beginning of a larger trend.

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Are natural toxins in fish harmful?

toxins story

Marine life has been naturally producing toxic chemicals well before chemical companies were manufacturing PCBs. But are these naturally-produced compounds as harmful as man-made environmental pollutants, and do those pose a human health threat?

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New tool sheds light on coral reef erosion

Marshall islands coral

The Marshall Islands is home to some pristine coral reefs, but storm-driven waves could erode these natural coastal barriers. A new wave abrasion simulator offers insights on coral erosion rates that could aid coastal planning in this low-lying island nation and elsewhere.

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WHOI joins effort to accelerate marine life protection technology

right whale video

WHOI has teamed up with Greentown Labs and Vineyard Wind to launch the Offshore Wind Challenge. The program, which is also partnering with New England Aquarium, calls on entrepreneurs to submit proposals to collect, transmit, and analyze marine mammal monitoring data using remote technologies, such as underwater vehicles, drones, and offshore buoys.

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Now you see me, now you don鈥檛

sand lance

Marine biologists tackle an unsettling mystery surrounding sand lance–eel-like, dive-bombing fish that have become a cornerstone forage species for a wide range of marine animals in the Gulf of Maine and northwest Atlantic Ocean.

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A sea of ancient ice

ancient ice

WHOI scientist dusts off historical accounts to tackle the long-standing mystery of just how thick Arctic sea ice was in the early 19th century.

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Spock versus the volcano

brain

Five hundred meters below the calm surface waters of the Aegean Sea off Santorini Island, Greece, lies an active submarine volcano. There, a decision-making robot equipped with artificial intelligence searches for life and danger.

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Understanding the Melting Arctic

Glaciologist Sarah Das explains why surface melting and runoff across Greenland鈥檚 mile-thick ice sheet sped up dramatically in the 20th and 21st centuries, showing no signs of abating.

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The Ocean鈥檚 Moveable Feast

Warming waters are changing the marine food web. 2串1技巧 Hole Oceanographic Institution Scientists Carin Ashjain and Glen Gawarkiewicz study those changes.

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Sea anemones with jet lag?

WHOI scientists investigate the internal body clocks of sea anemones to determine if fluctuating temperatures play a role in their daily rhythms.

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